Accessible Japan on YouTube

Accessible Japan on YouTube

While a picture may be worth a thousand words, a video is worth… well, a lot more! While doing some reviews a while ago, I decided to take a video as well as pictures.  It made me think, “why didn’t I start doing this earlier?!”  So, Accessible Japan has birthed a YouTube channel!   In addition to the blog updates I will take video and put it on the channel.  Hopefully it will provide more Read more…

Japanese Ballot Box

Two Women with Hearing-Impairments win Elections

Elections in Japan seem to be never ending. Being a foreigner, I of course cannot vote and usually just ignore the whole thing. However, the results of last weeks municipal elections caught my eye. Two women with hearing-impairments won seats in the assembly. The reason that this likely made the news was that one of them is rather famous. Rie Saito lost her hearing when she was one years old due to a meningitis infection Read more…

Ryogoku Kokugikan - Sumo Museum

Sumo Museum – Accessibility Report

The Sumo Museum is wheelchair accessible, and can be an interesting place to pop into while visiting the Edo-Tokyo Museum next door – but, being very small, is not something that should be a destination on its own. The museum is located on the first floor of the Ryogoku Kokugikan (note: three places in Tokyo use the name “Kokugikan”, so make sure you go to the right one!).  While the main use of the Kokugikan Read more…

Edo-Tokyo Museum

Edo-Tokyo Museum – Accessibility Report

Though settlements have existed in the Tokyo area since 3000 BCE, things really started in the 12th century CE when Edo Shigenaga, the military governor of a large Kanto province, erected his castle in present day Tokyo, calling it Edojuku.  Celebrating Tokyo’s long past, the Edo-Tokyo Museum is an excellent museum that is fantastically wheelchair accessible.  Check out our accessibility report below! General Information Established in 1993 and modelled after a kurazukuri style storehouse, The Read more…

A slope to get on the train

Riding the Train or Subway in Japan in a Wheelchair

If you are thinking of traveling to Japan, you may have run across a map of the subway and train lines in Tokyo and subsequently felt your jaw drop to the floor.  While there definitely are disadvantages to traveling with a wheelchair, in Japan it can be to your advantage. Getting your ticket and going to the ticket gate Many guidebooks discuss how to buy tickets, but in short: find your destination on the map Read more…

Disabled Japanese Artist Hisashi Fukushima

This site and blog mainly focuses on travel and lodging but we also want to share interesting disability-related and cultural stories as well.  So, meet Hisashi Fukushima, a prize-winning 46-year-old disabled man from Hidaka, Japan. Hisashi started drawing trains from the age of three.  Due to his developmental disability, he would commute to Kawagoe to a consultation center for children.  During these trips he became fascinated with the trains and railways that he saw and Read more…

Skip to content