Home Page Forums General Discussion Move to Japan

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  • #5360
    Avatarborntoroll89
    Participant

    Hi,

    I love Japan and my big Dream is to live there! But I guess it is difficult to move especially when you need lot of help everyday :( Has someone Tips or how I can start?

    Thank you so much :)

    Best wishes Julia

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #5361
    AvatarAccessible Japan
    Keymaster

    Hello,

    First of all, it is possible!  I (Josh) use attendant care and have moved here.  As a resident of your city, you are entitled to the same services as everyone else, including public welfare.

    You need to get in the country though.  To become resident of a city, you must be legally allowed to reside in the country – this means a visa.  Visas have a couple of types: student, working, spouse etc.  And they all require a sponsor (a school, employer, spouse, etc).  

    So before working through the logistics of personal care, you will need a way into the country.  Do you have any leads in that area?

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #5362
    Avatarborntoroll89
    Participant


    #5363
    AvatarAccessible Japan
    Keymaster

    Hmmm…. Can you please try sending your reply again? It came up blank…

    #5364
    Avatarborntoroll89
    Participant

    Of course I was surprised as well because there is just blank now ^^ I love Japanese Culture and Products more than here in Germany ^^ I only have a High School graduation but of course I would love to help and do mostly everything to give something back for the Society but I guess of course you won’t get a Visa if you don’t have a Job or Relatives there :( but it is logical <3

    Thank you very much for your Reply and Encouragement :) 

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #5365
    AvatarAccessible Japan
    Keymaster

    For the most part, you need a college degree for work visas here.  But maybe you could consider coming as a student?  A student also gets the same services.

    Have you visited Japan before? 

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #5366
    Avatarborntoroll89
    Participant

    To be honest not but I definitely want to! So I am very happy to find that here and that this Forum and Site exists is Awesome! Thank you for that :) 

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #5367
    AvatarAccessible Japan
    Keymaster

    Keep the questions coming!  And also feel free to share any useful information you find!

    I highly recommend you visit before planning on living here though.  I visited 4 times.  It helps you build a network of people who will be invaluable later.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #8618
    Avatarajaisha.bradford
    Participant

    Hello,

    I’m currently in the US and am considering a move to japan. My biggest thing is trying to figure out what visa to get, and also trying to find out what kinds of benefits I could get out there.

    I have a helper here in the US that would come with me…..how do I keep them employed as my helper in Japan??

     

    Any information you all have would be great!

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #8622
    AvatarAccessible Japan
    Keymaster

    Hi there!

    You are able to get helper benefits with any residency visa (work or student) as it is the city you live in that supplies the help and their only requirement (aside from a disability!) is that you be a city resident.  The benefits can vary depending on the city / ward though, so you will need to research the different areas to find a good place to locate.

    As for bringing your own helper, if you want them to be paid by the government as a helper here, they must have a visa.  Everyone who I know who has come over here has paid their helper directly for the transition period.  If the helper had a work visa (or a student visa) they could potentially register with a helper company and be assigned to you.  However, it will take at least 3 months for you to register with a city and get into the benefits system, which means that you must pay for your help – local or not – in that transition time.

    Not impossible of course, but may take extra finances/creativity.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #9198
    AvatarThomas E.
    Participant

    Hello Josh.

    First. I want to say thank you the Info you gave on the Youtube videos about life in Japan with a disability, I live in the US and all my life I’ve wanted to visit Japan. I’m retired now from being a Paramedic for close to 30yrs. I was injured an a call some many years back. With time, I got worse and worse. I worked til I was forced to stop and retire. Now that I have the time. I”ve been planning to come an visit Japan. I really want to see Shinjuku(big Godzilla fan). I’ve even been learning Japanese for the last 2yrs. I’ve watched many videos about Japan and I have family that live in Okinawa on the US Base. But I was not seeing much on the disabled in the videos. I saw so many small places, so many people and not very many accessible places. I can walk some, but not far. I use a electric chair or a rollator. I was starting to see that it might be hard for me there. I’m a big & tall man. Even if I was not in a electric chair, many place would be hard for me. In talking to My Wife. We started looking for other places to visit that might be easier for me to get around. One day She started talking about moving somewhere out of the States to retire. I told Her. “The only place I would move to was Japan.” So we started looking into Okinawa. I could see it was like the US a lot. Much more room. So, I started watching videos Japan again. And I came across the video you were in. And it changed My outlook of Japan a lot. I can see, that it is possible for me to go there or even live there. You answered many of My questions and have given Me hope again. If I can ask. What city do you live in and if there are cities easier or harder to get around? I would think, Shinjuku, would be every hard to get around. Thanks so much!!! Thomas

    #9206
    AvatarJosh
    Keymaster

    Hi Thomas,

    Thank you for the kind note. It makes starting this website all worth it. :)

    I live on the east side of Tokyo. There are certainly differences depending on the city you are in. Rural areas, or even areas away from a city center generally do have more space. But unfortunately, without a law like the ADA to regulate businesses, even if there is more space, restaurants etc often still may have steps. (Though, with the aging population, things are getting better.)

    Okinawa is beautiful and I would love to retire there too! The reverse challenge with the country, though, is you will need a car to get around as there is a lack of public transit. Or if there is public transit, it may not be accessible yet. But, I guess that is like any rural area in the world. :)

    If you have any questions, feel free to start a topic – will be glad to help :)

    #9222
    AvatarThomas E.
    Participant

    Good day Josh

    I hope you guys in Japan is having as nice weather like we has this week. The rain has cooled us down to the 80’s. Everyday before that it was in the 100’s.

    Thanks for your reply. You hit on one thing We have been wanting to know. CARS!!! We live in a city that only has a bus system and not a very good one. Everyone here has cars. I’ve only rode a train once. My Wife is from Chicago and hates public transit. I’ve heard it’s hard to get one because of cost.

    We are planning to come to Japan next year to visit and scope things out. I looking into renting a car and it was more than a house mortgage for 3 months!! I’ve chatted with someone online, how they got a car from someone who was moving back to the states. Our biggest concern is getting around how we wont and how we wont.

     

    #9229
    AvatarJosh
    Keymaster

    Unseasonably rainy here lately :(

    Great, coming to check things out is a great idea!  Let us know how we can help!

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