Search Results for 'wheelchair'

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Viewing 15 results - 1 through 15 (of 195 total)
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    mary
    Participant

    Hello!

    Have tried getting a quote for an airport transfer from Trojan taxi company but having trouble getting in touch. We need to get from Narita to our hotel in Shinjuku-ku. I have also been in touch with Wilgo, who have provided a quote. We have 3 people, one of whom is in an electric wheelchair.

    We’ve got quite a lot of luggage with us and are dubious about being able to take the train- do you have any advice?

    Cheers,

    Lucy

    #6322
    Avatar
    Accessible Japan
    Keymaster

    Hi,

    Hotel pools are very uncommon here.  If there is space for something like that, it would likely be used for a communal bath instead.

    American hotels like Hilton are the exception.  However, I have NEVER seen a pool lift outside of rehabilitation pools here in Japan.  Some community pools may have a ramp and a waterproof wheelchair though.

    Being carried in the sento/onsen requires the caregiver to be naked as well.  So, you better be close to them!

    1 user thanked author for this post.
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    Masahiro ABE
    Participant

    Callie14 san,

    Thank you for your message,

    I heard about your request from Wilgo Taxi.

    Wilgo will let me know the size of your wheelchair. If your wheelchairs and all your belongings fit my car, that is rather small, I can accept your offer. So, please communicate with Wilgo so far.

    Thank you,

     

     

     

    2 users thanked author for this post.
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    Callie14
    Participant

    Masahiro San,

    I do not know how to send you a first message. We are looking for a wheelchair accessible taxi to take us from Narita to Ichikawa,  where we are staying. We arrive August 27th. Would you be able to transport us from point to point outside the Tokyo area?

    Thank you!

     

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #6306
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    Callie14
    Participant

    Good morning! I think I may have found an Airbnb that the owner is willing to build a small wooden ramp up the first step. The rest of the apartment is totally flat, is on the first floor, and is located near Gyotoku Station.

    Thank you for all your help. When we arrive, I can send pics and a link to the apartment if you would like. That way, that’s an accessible Airbnb that you can have listed. I’m sure we’ll find the entrance to the toilet and tub room small, but the shower commode fits in most situations, so I’m hoping there will be no problem. I will await the information about the text wheelchair van and make an appointment for pick up.

    Thanks again! Btw, I ordered your book and it should arrive tomorrow.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #6295
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    Accessible Japan
    Keymaster

    Hello,

    I have asked Wilgo, a wheelchair van company to reply about the van.

    As for the hotel, I can try to find one, but Ichikawa doesn’t have many hotels to begin with. I assume you want to stay thee because you will need to go there regularly during your stay?  If so, would a hotel on the same train line be ok?

    Avatar
    Accessible Japan
    Keymaster

    Hello,

    Mark, thanks for the cpap info.

    As for the power wheelchair rental, most rental companies are very cautious about renting expensive equipment to foreign visitors over issues like insurance etc. So, a large power wheelchair would likely not be rentable here.  The only place that might is https://www.mec-design.jp/.  It is just on guy making them and wants to rent them to hotels etc, so he may be open to it.  However, I don’t think they are compatible with personalized seating.

    You can use foreign wheelchairs here no problem. However, mobility scooters are very uncommon and some train lines (like JRs Shinkansen) either don’t allow them or make you go through hoops.

    Hope this helps!

    1 user thanked author for this post.
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    Callie14
    Participant

    Hi there,

    Thank  you for having such an amazing website.

    We will not be in Japan for a while, but this gives us ample time for planning and arranging everything we need. We are needing to rent a wheelchair van from Narita on August 27 and will need a place to stay around the Ichikawa area that is accessible. My husband has ALS and will have his PWC, most likely his hoyer lift, Bipap, and shower chair. We are looking for a place that will accommodate all of these things. Would anyone know of a van taxi and an apartment hotel?

    Thanks in advance

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #6289

    In reply to: Visas and JET

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    Senpai
    Participant

    Hey Justin,

    On the contrary this is just the type of post I was looking for.  Someone who has actual experience with the application process of JET and has some background/desire to join it.  I use a manual propelled wheelchair but use a sideboard for transfers.

    Prior to my disability I actually had the opportunity to attend a Japanese high school for two weeks so I know what you mean when you talk about the layout of the school and how teachers change class rooms and not the students.

    I minored in Japanese at university (although my skill is now rather faded) and was considering even doing a Diploma of Education or a TESOL certification.  While we will never know for sure it does sound like they just placed you in the “too hard” basket and opted for another applicant which would require less paperwork and individual attention.

    Chris Broad which runs the ABroadinJapan Youtube channel and a popular Japan based podcast has talked about his JET application in a few podcast episodes before.  Other than taking a short ESL course and minoring in linguistics he has talked how he didn’t really meet any of the criteria of the JET program.  He discusses it a bit here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VDnj8IEWNc

    This is what leads me to think that other than your disability it sounds like you were a great candidate (from their perspective).

    Shame :(

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #6288

    In reply to: Visas and JET

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    Schroth.Sensei
    Moderator

    Senpai,

    I’m similarly looking to move to Japan, and getting a visa hasn’t been easy. Just a little about me, I use a motorized wheelchair for mobility and can’t walk/transfer myself.

    First, I have applied to JET on multiple occasions. They will never tell you the reason why they denied anyone, so I do not officially know why I haven’t been accepted. However, I’m certain it wasn’t my application paperwork because I did make it to the interview portion prior to being denied (I also felt the interview went very well). After the interview your paperwork is send to Tokyo for review and placement, where you can be denied if you simply can’t be placed somewhere. I also have a Bachelor degree in Education, so I don’t believe my education was a negative deciding factor. Before signing up the first time, I was able to get in contact with a JET coordinator and was informed that JET has hired people with disabilities (this person particularly knew of two who used wheelchairs), and they aren’t supposed to discriminate. During my research of JET and education facilities in Japan, I also discovered that many schools have multiple floors and no elevators, making it much more difficult to place someone like me in a school. For those who don’t know, unlike American schools where students change classes during different periods, teachers in Japan go to student classrooms (meaning a teacher must be able to access each classroom). I have been told by other employers this as well, in fact I was told I would of been a top pick for one position except that half the job is upstairs, so I they reluctantly denied me.

    I’m not telling you this to discourage you from signing up with JET, I still think it’s a great program with many benefits, just to inform you that it’s an uphill battle and not to count on it as your sole means to work in Japan. This is also just my perspective from the attempts I’ve made, you may have many other factors that can work for you.

     

    You being in the IT field could be advantageous in finding work in Japan, I’ve seen job postings looking for various IT jobs in Japan, but I do not know what factor your disability may play in such jobs.

    Other than that, I can’t say much. I hope to be working and living in Japan soon, even looking into studying abroad in Japan as a sort of foot-in-the-door to employment, but that’s a work in progress. Hopefully some others in the forums can share their experiences.

     

    Anyway, I hope this information helps,

    -Justin

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #6284
    Avatar
    Accessible Japan
    Keymaster

    Hello,

    Thanks Schroth.Sensei!

    As Senpai pointed out, cleaning is very important and if entering a communal bath you will likely need to leave your wheelchair at the change room.  So, either the in-room bath or a private bath “貸切風呂” (“kashikiri buro”) may be best. (It is also sometimes called a “family bath” because the whole family can use it together instead of splitting up men/women.)

    I have been to Pax Yoshino (https://www.pax-yoshino.com/barrierfree/) and used the private bath there and could get my wheelchair right up to the bath.  HOWEVER, even though I stayed in their “accessible” room, the door to the bath was too narrow!

    In Tokyo, there is an accessible sento that has grab bars in the large bath, but also a private bath: http://mikokuyu.com/family

    I know a group up in Yamagata that is run by a guy with a disability that can possible help arrange equipment and a location for you.

    As the population is aging here, things are getting better and accessibility at onsen/sento is becoming more of a topic.  There is even a book on accessible onsen: https://amzn.to/2OBMJ0U

    I know the author and hopefully we can get an English version out someday!

    Know there are challenges, but don’t give up!

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #6282
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    Senpai
    Participant

    I can only speak to my experience prior to my disability so in no way know a ton.  The Japanese have a saying ” 出る釘は打たれる “.  It means “the nail that sticks out gets hammered down.”

    A few things I thought of as I read your post.  If an onsen is disabled friendly they may have a shower chair you can transfer to to clean before you go into the onsen.  I don’t think any onsen would allow you to enter without first cleaning as they is a huge faux pas.

    Also please check with a medical professional regarding the suitably of onsen and your condition.  I know my condition allows my lower half to burn easily as I don’t get the feedback that the area is too hot and onsen are very hot.

    As for ryokan I think this would also be very hard to find.  Most ryokan are small and family operated and as a result don’t cater for wheelchairs.  If there is any upstairs component you can almost guarantee that there will not be a lift.  Given that ryokan are meant to be authentic I can’t see them having western style beds or raised tables.  Another thing I do not know what they would think about is a wheelchair on tatami mats.  Given that your wheels act like shoes they may dislike this as it would bring in dirt just like peoples shoes.

     

     

    #6280
    Avatar
    Codes
    Participant

    If/when I ever do make it to Japan, I’ll want to try a hot spring resort. In America, we have them, but they are very rare and they’re never hot enough to actually make a difference. I have a lot of spasticity, so I’m sure the heat could really help relax my muscles. However, it would be a logistical challenge. I was wondering if you guys have had any recommendations for me.

    Here are the accommodations that would make it easier for me

    • Grab bars/something to hold on to while I stand in the changing rooms. I’ve gotten creative with things before, I can do sinks, countertops, anything that gives me some bracing.
    • Accessible shower areas. I know that in at Onsen you’re supposed to shower before entering the bath, but this would be a huge challenge. I wouldn’t be able to transfer out of my chair to a bench or something, as I cannot stay upright without my chair.
    • Accessible bathroom. So long as I can get a chair in an area with a toilet, I’m good.
    • Wheelchair access up to the baths. I know a lot of these places allow you to take a chair up to the changing rooms, but many either don’t allow chairs in the baths or have steps/barriers that lead to the baths.
    • Hoist/Chairlift. In America, all public pools at hotels and resorts must have chair lifts that can lower guests into the water. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, here’s a link. I’ve never even heard of these existing in Japan, but if they do, that would make my life much easier
    • Something to hold onto in the water. Because I have issues with balance, that would help me feel more secure

    Also, If I’m doing the whole ryokan experience with dinner and an overnight stay, I’d need:

    • A raised western-style bed.
    • Raided tables

    Obviously, I know all of those things in one place is very unrealistic, but I’d like to find the closest thing to what I need. Obviously, when you have a disability, you can adapt to many different situations, but the easier, the better .:)

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #6276
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    Chang
    Participant

    Hello Shaun,

    I don’t know much about hotels with roll-in showers, can only comment from my experience.

    My dad uses wheelchair, when we visit Tokyo and decided to visit Asakusa (Senso-Ji)

    We stayed at Richmond Hotel Premier Asakusa International.

    The room is not very wide (We add one more bed; 3 beds in one room so quite crowded)

    The bathroom door is not wide enough for wheelchair direct roll-in, but if the user can stand and walk for short distance from the shower door to into the shower room, they have the chair provided for sit-bath with movable shower. My dad took a bath this way. He had stroke and now can only walk for short distance, we found the toilet quite convenience, as he can sit and bath.

    I am sorry I could not provide more helpful info, hope that the comment can help you find the room you like more or less.

    We had enjoyed our times there, wish you Have a great time! :)

    Best,

    Chang

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #6274
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    Chang
    Participant

    Hi,

     

    I stayed there for a night, for the transportation a short taxi ride from Ginza Station or any area near Ginza is recommended. The hotel is not very near the the train station.

    I agree with the previous comments that they do have the wheelchair accessible room listed for reservation in the website.

     

    I stayed at Room Type C, it’s quite spacious although not very wide in terms of width (the room is L shaped), but the toilet is a bit small if you want to take wheelchair in.

    I recommend booking specifically for the wheelchair access room.

    My dad uses wheelchair too, he thinks the hotels in Tokyo did a good job in supporting wheelchair users.

    Wish you have a great time! :)

     

    Best,

    Chang

     

    1 user thanked author for this post.
Viewing 15 results - 1 through 15 (of 195 total)